Additional forces (iPython)

This tutorial gives you a very quick overview of how that works. Implementing additional forces in python as below will typically be a factor of a few slower than a C implementation. For a library that has C implementations for several commonly used additional effects (with everything callable from Python), see REBOUNDx.

Stark problem

We’ll start be adding two particles, the Sun and an Earth-like planet to REBOUND.

import rebound
sim = rebound.Simulation()
sim.integrator = "whfast"
sim.add(m=1.)
sim.add(m=1e-6,a=1.)
sim.move_to_com()  # Moves to the center of momentum frame

We could integrate this system and the planet would go around the star at a fixed orbit with \(a=1\) forever. Let’s add an additional constant force that acting on the planet and is pointing in one direction \(F_x = m\cdot c\), where \(m\) is the planet’s mass and \(c\) a constant. This is called the Stark problem. In python we can describe this with the following function

ps = sim.particles
c = 0.01
def starkForce(reb_sim):
    ps[1].ax += c

Next, we need to tell REBOUND about this function.

sim.additional_forces = starkForce

Now we can just integrate as usual. Let’s keep track of the eccentricity as we integrate as it will change due to the additional force.

import numpy as np
Nout = 1000
es = np.zeros(Nout)
times = np.linspace(0.,100.*2.*np.pi,Nout)
for i, time in enumerate(times):
    sim.integrate(time, exact_finish_time=0) # integrate to the nearest timestep so WHFast's timestep stays constant
    es[i] = sim.particles[1].e

And let’s plot the result.

%matplotlib inline
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(15,5))
ax = plt.subplot(111)
plt.plot(times, es);
../_images/Forces_9_0.png

You can see that the eccentricity is oscillating between 0 and almost 1.

Note that the function starkForce(reb_sim) above receives the argument reb_sim when it is called. This is a pointer to the simulation structure. Instead of using the global ps variable to access particle data, one could also use reb_sim.contents.particles. This could be useful when one is running multiple simulations in parallel or when the particles get added and removed (in those cases particles might change). The contents has the same meaning a -> in C, i.e. follow the memory address. To find out more about pointers, check out the ctypes documentation.

Non-conservative forces

The previous example assumed a conservative force, i.e. we could describe it as a potential as it is velocity independent. Now, let’s assume we have a velocity dependent force. This could be a migration force in a protoplanetary disk or PR drag. We’ll start from scratch and add the same two particles as before.

sim = rebound.Simulation()
sim.integrator = "ias15"
sim.add(m=1.)
sim.add(m=1e-6,a=1.)
sim.move_to_com()  # Moves to the center of momentum frame

But we change the additional force to be

ps = sim.particles
tau = 1000.
def migrationForce(reb_sim):
    ps[1].ax -= ps[1].vx/tau
    ps[1].ay -= ps[1].vy/tau
    ps[1].az -= ps[1].vz/tau

We need to let REBOUND know that our force is velocity dependent. Otherwise, REBOUND will not update the velocities of the particles.

sim.additional_forces = migrationForce
sim.force_is_velocity_dependent = 1

Now, we integrate as before. But this time we keep track of the semi-major axis instead of the eccentricity.

Nout = 1000
a_s = np.zeros(Nout)
times = np.linspace(0.,100.*2.*np.pi,Nout)
for i, time in enumerate(times):
    sim.integrate(time)
    a_s[i] = sim.particles[1].a
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(15,5))
ax = plt.subplot(111)
ax.set_xlabel("time")
ax.set_ylabel("semi-major axis")
plt.plot(times, a_s);
../_images/Forces_17_0.png

The semi-major axis decaus exponentially on a timescale tau.

In the above example, REBOUND is calling a python function at every timestep. This can be slow. Note that you can also set rebound.additional_forces to a c function pointer. This let’s you speed up the simulation significantly. However, you need to write you own c function/library that knows how to calculate the forces. Or, you use Dan Tamayo’s new migration library (in preparation).